Digital clutter – when to let it go

no clutter

Late in December, I subscribed to an online yoga class service, for a reasonable monthly fee. I had used this service in the past and enjoyed a few of the classes immensely. Many of the classes were not to my liking; however, since I could pay for only the classes I liked, I thought it was a great deal. Then, the delivery format changed and my favorite classes were no longer available at the click of a button (nor available for download any longer). I thought I would give the new format a try and see if I could broaden my horizons a little bit at the same time, while I tried out new-to-me styles of yoga and streamed classes created by new teachers.

Alas, I did not like the new format. I could tell almost immediately that it was not going to be a good fit for me. Still, perhaps out of loyalty to the old format and teachers, I decided to continue using the service a while longer to see if I had been too quick to judge. For three months, I logged in to the service every couple of weeks to try another class. About two weeks ago, after suffering through another class that did not suit me, I had finally had enough. I cancelled my subscription.

I’m glad I gave the service a chance. While I could have cancelled my subscription earlier, I feel as if I thoroughly tested the format before I decided to hit that “unsubscribe” button. I’m not sure I would have unsubscribed from a free service, though, which leads me to wonder if I have any other digital clutter floating around in cyberspace. In fact, I am certain I have many accounts at a random assortment of sites and services. I am vowing to unsubscribe from them as I come across them – if they don’t have any value, it is time to let them go!

 

Leave a comment: Do you have any digital clutter? Does it bother you or concern you? How and when do you decide to let it go?

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Minimalist wardrobe revisited

Aahhh, the beginning of April! Time for spring and time to refresh my closet with my April-June “capsule” wardrobe (go to http://theproject333.com/ for more information).

What I learned in my first round of The Project 333 is that I actually need two capsule wardrobes – one suitable for a professional office and one for home. My clothes for these two purposes are vastly different, and I’ve found there is no way to mash all of them into one 33-item list. For example, I have 2 ball caps which I wear all the time around home (why two? one is for yard work – blech – and the other one is for everything else), and there is no way these ball caps could be re-purposed for work. This is not to say that my clothes for home are sloppy or not presentable; on the contrary, most of them are perfectly fine for buzzing around town doing errands. Yet they are not appropriate for work, so there can be very little overlap between the two wardrobes.

boy in hat crop

Living with far fewer clothes has been a wonderful change in my life, helping me to simplify my daily routines and consistently wear clothes that are more flattering. But almost every day, I need to get dressed twice: once when I leave for work in the morning and again when I change my clothes after work. While I would dearly love to have the kind of job where I can wear jeans and a t-shirt every day, I can’t see that happening any time in the near future. For the time being, I am going to continue to allow myself to have two separate wardrobes.

On my journey to Live to Be 100, I’m going to be realistic about my life and as kind as possible to myself. What about you?